Thursday, October 4, 2018

Natural Yeast Japanese Milk Loaf (Cold Ferment)






Let Your Passion Be Your Guide"We do not know who we are until we see what we can do " - Martha Crimes

I was reading  Chicken Soup For the Soul - Life Lessons for Mastering the Law of Attraction and these are the words that pop out before my eyes  ...Let Your Passion Be Your Guide -  "We do not know who we are until we see what we can do " - Martha Grimes .....this is really an encouragement for my bread journey.

Wow, I love making bread and I find that challenging. I have tried many methods and different recipes using different ingredients to make the bread soft and fluffy.  

Now I am into the challenge of making Sourdough Bread. At the moment ,I am still using the discard to make other bread such as flatbread like Pita Bread, Focaccia and Sourdough Banana Bread and many others . Yesterday, I took a step further to bake this Japanese Milk Loaf,  turning my sourdough starter into natural yeast for making this soft and fluffy bread. 

Seriously, we do not know who we are until we see what we can do, so true.  I thought I will never be able to bake bread using natural starter as natural yeast.  For today , I will be sharing my journey on making this Japanese Milk Loaf.  This recipe takes 12 hrs to 15 hrs of cold fermentation and after taking out to proof, it will normally takes 2 hrs to proof and the dough will rise to the brim of the pullman tin but for me it took nearly 6 hrs , so meaning, mine took longer to proof.  I was worried and texted my friend to tell her , gosh , something is wrong with the process.  My friend texted me back and say be patient and wait.  So true , proofing time depends on the strength of the natural yeast. Using natural yeast in making bread needs Time and Patience.  I have the time but no patience..I need to learn be patient in order to bake beautiful bread using Natural Yeast.   Eventually , my bread came out of the oven, looking gorgeous and tasted so good that I went to bed happy. Took shots of the bread to send to my friend in Melbourne . She rejoices with me and she encouraged me to bake Sourdough bread and okay , now I am confident to take on the real Sourdough Bread.  And after reading the first few pages of this book I am reading, I am encouraged and will take a step further to and bake my first Sourdough Bread. Stay tuned for it.






Keep the dough into a plastic bag pre-coated with a little oil.
Place the dough in a bowl, and allow it to stand in room temperature for about 1.5 to 2 hours.


place the dough in the bowl covered with a lid, and store in a fridge for 12 hours at least




Continue to knead till the dough reaches window pane stage. This takes about 10 to 15 minutes.




Shape the dough into 3 balls by pulling down the sides, and seal at the  bottom.

Cover and let them rest for about 15 min.





Flatten the dough and roll out into a  oval dough




Roll up the dough from the shorter side, cover with a lid, 
and let it rest for 10 minutes.




After second proofing, brush a coat of fresh milk  over the dough.




 if your Pullman tin has a thinner wall, 
you can bake for about 40 minutes 
at the same temperature.


Remove the bread from the Pullman tin immediately after leaving the oven. 
Let the loaf cool down on a wire rack before slicing it. 
Slice with bread knife.




look how soft and fluffy the bread is



Natural Yeast Japanese Milk Loaf - adapted from My Mind Patch


Bread weight: 485g
Raw dough weight: 529g
Room temperature: 29.9 degree C
Yield: one 20x10x11cm loaves 

Ingredients
All ingredients in room temperature 
250g bread flour
100g natural yeast
25g fine sugar
8g coconut/vegetable oil
4g fine salt

155g fresh milk

20g unsalted butter

* 100% hydration (flour:water = 1:1)
# about 1/2 tsp

Glazing
Some milk 


Directions
1. Feed 130g of active natural yeast with 10g each of cool boiled water and unbleached bread flour. Wait for the natural yeast to double in volume. For good active natural yeast, it should be able to double itself within 60 to 90 minutes. Use the natural yeast, while it is still active, within 3 hours after feeding.
Collect 100g for baking, and keep the remaining in the fridge.

2. Allow fresh milk to return to room temperature.
 
3. Mix all ingredients, except butter, in a mixing bowl.
 
4. Stir in one direction to combine the ingredients into a lump. Cover with a lid, and let it rest for 15 to 20 minutes to allow the flour to fully absorb the liquid.
 
 5. As the dough is quite sticky, wearing a CPE disposable gloves would make kneading easier. Knead the dough by slamming, pulling, and folding the dough, until the dough becomes smooth. This process takes about 10 minutes.
 
6. Spread out the dough and apply softened butter onto it. Knead to incorporate butter into the dough.
 
7. Continue to knead till the dough reaches window pane stage. This takes about 10 to 15 minutes.
 
8. Shape the dough into a ball by pulling down the sides several times, till the dough surface is stretched and smoothen, and seal at the bottom.
 
9. Keep the dough into a plastic bag pre-coated with a little oil.
Squeeze out all the air and tie the opening with a loose knot. To prevent moisture loss in the fridge, keep the dough in another plastic bag. Place the dough in a bowl, and allow it to stand in room temperature for about 1.5 to 2 hours. 1 hour 30 min later, the dough became inflated.
 
10. Finally, place the dough in the bowl covered with a lid, and store in a fridge for 12 hours at least.
I stored it for about 15 hours.
 
11. On the next morning, transfer the cold dough out of the fridge. Invert the dough with the base facing up, and allow the dough to thaw for about 1 hour.

12. While waiting for the dough to thaw,  apply a thin coat of butter on the Pullman tin interior walls. Set aside.
 
13. Cut open the plastic bag, and turn the dough onto a floured work top. 
 
14. Flatten the dough to release the trapped air. Divide the dough into 3 equal portions, about 178g each.  It's okay if the dough is still cold to touch.
 
15. Shape the dough into 3 balls by pulling down the sides, and seal at the  bottom.
Cover and let them rest for about 15 min.
 
16. Flatten the dough and roll out into a  oval dough.
 
17. Roll up the dough from the shorter side, cover with a lid, and let it rest for 10 minutes.
 
18. After the rest, roll out the dough into a flat dough again. The shorter length of the dough should correspond to the shorter width of the Pullman tin. Place the dough into a greased non-stick Pullman tin. The open end of the dough should be facing down.  
 
20. Spray some water over the doughs and place them in a closed oven.
Let the dough proof in a warm oven for about 90 to 120 minutes, or till the dough reaches about the rim of the Pullman tin.
To facilitates the second proofing, you may switch on the oven to its minimal temperature for about 1 minute.
 
21. After the second proofing and the dough has reached about the rim of the Pullman tin, remove the dough out of the oven. Preheat the oven to 170  degree Celsius.  And brush a coat of fresh milk  over the dough.
 
22. Bake the dough at the lower rack of the oven at 170 degree Celsius for about 50 minutes. If your Pullman tin has a thinner wall, you can bake for about 40 minutes at the same temperature.
 
23. Remove the bread from the Pullman tin immediately after leaving the oven. Let the loaf cool down on a wire rack before slicing it. Slice with bread knife.
 
Note:
For step (21), if you apply egg wash instead of fresh milk, you'll get a glossy top


Enjoy!

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